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Skidushe

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Everything posted by Skidushe

  1. 0% monitor distance matching (horizontal/vertical)
  2. The issue is you move to a state where you're choosing an arbitrary value for all your sensitivities. You're then learning muscle memory for aiming at the crosshair for every different FOV. Which if you can deal with that and would rather move your arm roughly the same amount each time, then I guess it's okay. 0%mm is keeping the same muscle memory across the FOVs at the crosshair. It makes sense that if you move further in, you're going to have to move your arm more but crucially, it's the same 'more' amount as it was before for the size of the target. IMO, if your sensitivity isn't ridiculously high or low it's still the way to go. Playing a wide range of games with 0% mm across them all gets you to use the right part of the kinetic chain from your shoulder to your fingertips correctly. Small adjustment, fingertip. Large adjustment, shoulder. etc... Over time it just becomes one fluid motion, but it's not instant, it's something you need to adapt to. If you want to train this, I'd recommend getting really good at OSU! with a low sensitivity, it's basically a fast paced sniper training game for 0% mmers and involves both small movements and large and helps train you to use your entire arm, shoulder wrist and fingertips
  3. Unless you have a terribly shocking mouse, you shouldn't feel a difference if you keep your cm/360 the same. If you care, I use 1800 DPI
  4. Because you chose your all with ADS option it's also converting your hipfire sensitivity to xFactorAiming with 0% monitor distance match. If you were to be consitstant with 0% monitor distance match you should change the value to that, if you want to keep it as is, just ignore it but know that you won't be converting consistently to other games. I don't know what battlefield uses that value for, someone else might know ( @DPI Wizard )And if you wanted to keep it at 0.02, you can change your conversion settings to represent what would give you 0.02
  5. Have a look at the FAQ section in the bottom of this thread:
  6. It's what most would consider 'slow' but It's certainly playable. I played with a ever so slightly faster sens than that for about 2 years with 0% mm and I did fine. As long as you're fine with moving your whole arm and have a large mouse pad I'd stick with it if you're comfortable. I recently changed mouse and mouse pad and decided to change my sens to 35cm/360 ~103FOV which I thought was a happy mid ground for the cs/overwatch I play but I played on 40cm/360 before which Is really close to your 42 and played fine if not better until I adjust to my new setup with 0% MM I'd consider a 'very low' sens > 50cm/360 probably And yes, if FOV's are the same you can use 360 and you should get the exact same numbers (regardless of the conversion method)
  7. The issue you had the first time is that you had hipfire as 360 distance when it should be 0% monitor distance matching
  8. anything changed with the latest update?
  9. Changing FOV per se isn't bad for muscle memory, but it makes the experience of the game feel different which can throw you off. If you used 0% monitor matching your muscle memory at the crosshair would be right for any FOV, but it would feel weird having large differences between FOVs. If you used 360 distance it wouldn't feel weird but you wouldn't have good muscle memory. There's a tradeoff so I guess it's mainly what kind of games you play but for most shooter games the entire point is accuracy and so for me 0% monitor distance match takes the cake every single time and I try set FOVs as close as possible between games. I find 103 degrees is the sweetspot for me. Any more and even if I can see more stuff everything gets so far away and distorted which is detrimental for aiming. So in answer to your question, I'd recommend using around the same FOV on all games (doesn't have to be exact) and also use 0% monitor distance matching
  10. Yes, the calculator adjusts to the different FOVs. It's why it's there. The reason I said what I did is that if you have two very different FOVs for hipfire, say 130 vs 100 0% MM can feel weird for some people and they prefer 360 distance as their conversion method. I'd still go with 0% monitor distance matching but that's my preference for my setup and other peoples opinions vary
  11. Bottom right there should be a box which says conversion method Location, switch it to in game
  12. This is just pubg being irritating to set up exact sensitivity values. There should be around that text a file url to the gameusersettings file which you can change your sensitivity to an exact value in. I don't have my pc rn because I'm waiting for a return on some RAM that broke but It should be in: %LOCALAPPDATA%\TslGame\Saved\Config\WindowsNoEditor which you can copy paste into the file explorer, then open 'GameUserSettings.ini' in whatever editor you want. There's a really longggg line with the sensitivity values in. do Ctrl-f and seatch for 'LastConvertedSensitivity' and there should be them one after another as the calculator shows and you can put the two values in for what it shows in game or what it shows in the config file (The reason there's two is because the values they use for the game engine are small and wouldn't be easy for a person to understand in game so they set up a linear relationship between them) BUT there is an easier way to do this. Convert using the 'in-game' method in the calculator, then go into game, type them into the box on the left next to the slide and DONT HIT ENTER and move onto the next box until you've filled them all in remembering not to hit enter then hit apply. Your sensitivities will be set propperly for both the 'in-game' value and also the 'config file' value. There is one caveat to this which is more pubg's problem. If you go and change any keybindings and hit apply after you've set these again it will round your sens values to the nearest whole number. as shown in the settings window. Your two options are either re type in the sens values if you need to change the key bindings, or edit the config file directly to update your keybindings. Hope this helped.. -Tom
  13. If you were doing what you were trying to do in the first place, Take the 'cm to move cursor across screen' value and double it then use that as your cm/360 with the same DPI and it would give you your sens value. Don't know why but if it works for you go for it 😂 If you're looking for something else, I'd recommend 0% monitor distance matching
  14. Try convert your game sensitivity to windows desktop and use that DPI, then make sure your in game sensitivities are the same as before. E.G. If you did: new DPI = old DPI x 2 new sens = old sens x (1/2) Or more generally: new DPI = old DPI x k new sens = old sens x (1/k)
  15. You mean for desktop? Or something else? DPI shouldn't affect your ingame sensitivity if you keep DPI x sens the same ?
  16. I'll tell you it's worth it, 1440p 144Hz Gsync for games is glorious
  17. third-ed, I have the hero sensor in mine, would love to see how well it performs with science! 😛
  18. This is called frame buffering from what I gather. It aims to stop stuttering and repeated frames by working in the past and showing you what it knows it's already rendered and not be scared that the next frame won't be ready. This adds latency as you're running a few frames behind, so it's not just the mouse that's behind, it's everything being shown on your monitor. For competitive games you're much better of having it off, reduces latency. For non-competitive games, it might give you a smoother experience which you might find more enjoyable, but even then for me I'd still prefer the lowest input lag, regardless of possible tearing. The effect does reduce with higher refresh rate monitors too. You can see what it does here, explains it much better than I can in words:
  19. I think this may be born out of a comment I made in my guide. The 'ring' isn't strictly true, and I do mention this in a spoiler but it's a good analogy for what it's doing if you ignore some weird affect of moving around a 3d sphere with a 2d mouse pad which sounds stupid but works for lower FOVs as way of thinking about it. You can see this, go into a game, look up to the top, then look down a bit. Move your mouse as perfect a diagonal you can on the pad and you'll see your crosshair curl up to the pole of the 'ball' which is your view. The ring you've drawn if you take my representation (which is still strictly wrong yes) is about 25% monitor distance matching, if you were to aim to a point on that 'ring' on your screen in one movement, it would be the same movement across all FOV's on your monitor *When you aim vertically or horizontally from the equator of the ball 0% takes the focal length scaling as Skwuruhl said, but I think though they do the same thing it's easier to take the calculus approach, smaller and smaller rings, to see what it gives you. Imagine a ring smaller than what you've drawn, then smaller again, then again and you'll end up with a ring underneath your crosshair, taking the analogy your 'one movement' to get onto the ring is now infinitely small, and you're always on the ring, so however you aim, you're always aiming with perfect muscle memory at the crosshair in small motions. It changes from the matching flicks mentality (match distance) to matching moving around on your screen. Imagine painting on a piece of paper from far away, then you move your head towards your brush so you can get some fine detail in. To your eyes you need to scale your input to make it so your movements match the original movements physically, so say you zoom in 2x, to do some fine work, you now half your movements to your eyes to keep everything the same on the paper but you can now see much better and be more precise at 'moving'. Note not jumping around the page as is analogous to distance matching, but moving the brush. Hopefully you can see how this is analogous to a sniper scope
  20. You've converted PUBG -> CS:GO with 360 distance, and then I couldn't work out how you got your osu figures but because it must be based not off of a 360 distance measurement it would be a FOV dependent measurement i.e. viewspeed, monitor distance match which are dependent on the FOV you had in the original games so you will get different values for osu. If you wanted consistency, you need to choose an FOV dependent conversion from pubg -> cs:go and pubg -> osu
  21. post some screenshots of what you're doing in the calculator including the top bit with the 4 drop down menus and hopefully we can help!
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