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Brian goh

CSGO sens to Fortnite

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Hi all, 

I am very confused by the whole 360 distance/viewspeed/monitor distance. Which am I suppose to use if I want to convert my 2.02 and 400 dpi sensitivity in CSGO to fortnite?

Any help would be much appreciated thankssss

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A change in FOV means a change in perceived sensitivity, so you must use a conversion method other than 360 distance. Why this is the case is explained in this video:

Monitor matching follows the principle of gear ratios to sync different FOVs. A representation of this concept is shown in this diagram:

th?id=OIP.yXmtv3KEPit4jqxz0WCzVAHaE8&pid

How this applies to converting sensitivity is that each "gear" (from 0 FOV to 180 FOV) shares the same chord length, as shown in this diagram:

1123261099_gearratiodiagram.png.47d1af6480f9baa6ae3d11779b5dfece.png

It's important to note that the gear ratio method produces exactly the same result as 100% monitor match. However, this does not mean that 100% is the best method to use. This is because what exactly is "100%" is arbitrary. It completely depends on the physical dimensions of your monitor. If you assume the chord length is also the length of your monitor then you can imagine how different sized monitor lengths would also produce different sized chord lengths and therefore a completely different range of sensitivities for all FOV. What is 100% for one person's monitor will not be the same for another person, as shown in this diagram:

718629076_100monitormatchisarbitrary.png.423108d4f970e44bc8af9d86c4ba315c.png

You also have to take into account your sitting distance from the monitor. If you sit closer to the monitor, your sensitivity will feel faster and your field of view will decrease. If you sit further from the monitor, your sensitivity will feel slower and your field of view will increase. This plays an important part in determining your sensitivity, especially if you have to convert between two differently sized monitors. Keep in mind that different points on the monitor have different distances from your eyes, as shown in this diagram:

1220791487_visualangle.png.22379ae487af49fa8cf28ec0f6b64624.png

 

So if 100%, and every other percentage for that matter, is arbitrary then what monitor match percentage do you use?

Well, you could mess around with it and pick one, keeping in mind the fact that different monitor size and sitting distance affects the actual percentage as it changes from setup to setup, but that is far too arbitrary, and there is honestly a much better answer... rather than experiment with arbitrary values, why don't you pick 0%? 0% is not arbitrary. It remains consistent and relative no matter what setup you use.

And it has the following advantages:

  • Maintains precision at the crosshair
  • As you approach a target it gets closer to your crosshair, so having your crosshair matched at the edge of your monitor, like 100% would do, would only make you feel less in control as you approach a target with the crosshair, whereas with 0% you feel more in control
  • 0% is aspect-ratio independent, so easy to make calculations with. No need to use a 1:1 aspect ratio.
  • 0% is the only percentage that maintains muscle memory for tracking, due to the fact that it matches the speed of the crosshair rather than just a point on the monitor, as shown in this video:
  • Everyone seems to agree now that 0% is the best method to use. Not that you should follow the crowd... >.>

For more elaboration, we all talked a lot about it in this forum post:

 

perfect-sensitivity.zip

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6 hours ago, potato psoas said:

A change in FOV means a change in perceived sensitivity, so you must use a conversion method other than 360 distance. Why this is the case is explained in this video:

Monitor matching follows the principle of gear ratios to sync different FOVs. A representation of this concept is shown in this diagram:

th?id=OIP.yXmtv3KEPit4jqxz0WCzVAHaE8&pid

How this applies to converting sensitivity is that each "gear" (from 0 FOV to 180 FOV) shares the same chord length, as shown in this diagram:

1123261099_gearratiodiagram.png.47d1af6480f9baa6ae3d11779b5dfece.png

It's important to note that the gear ratio method produces exactly the same result as 100% monitor match. However, this does not mean that 100% is the best method to use. This is because what exactly is "100%" is arbitrary. It completely depends on the physical dimensions of your monitor. If you assume the chord length is also the length of your monitor then you can imagine how different sized monitor lengths would also produce different sized chord lengths and therefore a completely different range of sensitivities for all FOV. What is 100% for one person's monitor will not be the same for another person, as shown in this diagram:

718629076_100monitormatchisarbitrary.png.423108d4f970e44bc8af9d86c4ba315c.png

You also have to take into account your sitting distance from the monitor. If you sit closer to the monitor, your sensitivity will feel faster and your field of view will decrease. If you sit further from the monitor, your sensitivity will feel slower and your field of view will increase. This plays an important part in determining your sensitivity, especially if you have to convert between two differently sized monitors. Keep in mind that different points on the monitor have different distances from your eyes, as shown in this diagram:

1220791487_visualangle.png.22379ae487af49fa8cf28ec0f6b64624.png

 

So if 100%, and every other percentage for that matter, is arbitrary then what monitor match percentage do you use?

Well, you could mess around with it and pick one, keeping in mind the fact that different monitor size and sitting distance affects the actual percentage as it changes from setup to setup, but that is far too arbitrary, and there is honestly a much better answer... rather than experiment with arbitrary values, why don't you pick 0%? 0% is not arbitrary. It remains consistent and relative no matter what setup you use.

And it has the following advantages:

  • Maintains precision at the crosshair
  • As you approach a target it gets closer to your crosshair, so having your crosshair matched at the edge of your monitor, like 100% would do, would only make you feel less in control as you approach a target with the crosshair, whereas with 0% you feel more in control
  • 0% is aspect-ratio independent, so easy to make calculations with. No need to use a 1:1 aspect ratio.
  • 0% is the only percentage that maintains muscle memory for tracking, due to the fact that it matches the speed of the crosshair rather than just a point on the monitor, as shown in this video:
  • Everyone seems to agree now that 0% is the best method to use. Not that you should follow the crowd... >.>

For more elaboration, we all talked a lot about it in this forum post:

 

perfect-sensitivity.zip

So from what I understand, am I suppose to convert my csgo senstivity into a distance so that I can convert it using monitor distance at 0%? 

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1 hour ago, Brian goh said:

So from what I understand, am I suppose to convert my csgo senstivity into a distance so that I can convert it using monitor distance at 0%? 

Change the calculator to advanced mode, set the input game to CSGO, put in your details, select the conversion method, and then save that as a profile. Then set the output to a different game or a different fov to get the converted sensitivity.

As for what conversion method to use, give this a read.

Edited by Drimzi

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