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Skidushe

formula for error when away from mm %

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I'm trying to create a visual to see the different mm% as gradients away from the ring they sit on your monitor, is there some sort of formula for seeing how much error there is in aiming, say I have a sensitivity for 25%, but I aim where mm at 15% would be, is there a simple % error between the two percentages or is there something else? thanks

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There is a formula for this indeed, but I think it would be quite complicated. I'll take a look at it when I have some time, but other math wizards on this forum might come up with before that.

However it's quite easy to do if you know the outputs and degrees:

For instance if you know mm 25% is:

  • 27294 counts pr. 360
  • 14.04 degrees (not important for the calculation)

And 15% is:

  • 27522 counts pr. 360
  • 8.53 degrees

you can easily calculate that the 25% calculation will equal

(27294/360*8.53)/(27522/360*8.53) = 99.17%

Or 0.83% difference, to move 15%.

You can do this yourself by using the numbers from the calculator, but a formula from scratch will be more complex.

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Pretty sure the error % will only be based on pure horizontal or vertical movement (scripted movement). Error % for diagonal movement to any other point on the ring will be too complex to work out, and due to only vertical movement following the geodesic, I don't think you even land on the ring with the correct distance moved anyway. Diagonal movement will behave differently for every FOV.

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On 9/13/2018 at 11:55 PM, DPI Wizard said:

There is a formula for this indeed, but I think it would be quite complicated. I'll take a look at it when I have some time, but other math wizards on this forum might come up with before that.

However it's quite easy to do if you know the outputs and degrees:

For instance if you know mm 25% is:

  • 27294 counts pr. 360
  • 14.04 degrees (not important for the calculation)

And 15% is:

  • 27522 counts pr. 360
  • 8.53 degrees

you can easily calculate that the 25% calculation will equal


(27294/360*8.53)/(27522/360*8.53) = 99.17%

Or 0.83% difference, to move 15%.

You can do this yourself by using the numbers from the calculator, but a formula from scratch will be more complex.

is that calculation not the same as just doing:

CountsPer360FirstMatch / CountsPer360DeviatedMatch

Or even

SensFirstMatch / SensDeviatedMatch

 

Edited by Skidushe

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2 minutes ago, Skidushe said:

is that calculation not the same as just doing:


CountsPer360FirstMatch / CountsPer360DeviatedMatch

 

It sure is. I started making a formula to do the whole thing, but began to shorten it based on values from the calculator. Didn't immediately see I was left with the same FOV on both sides :D

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1 minute ago, DPI Wizard said:

It sure is. I started making a formula to do the whole thing, but began to shorten it based on values from the calculator. Didn't immediately see I was left with the same FOV on both sides :D

Brilliant, so I can just use the calculated sensitivities. I've got a project that should show why low mm %ages are better as you approach 0% but I needed this deviation, thanks

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