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Hello I tried %0MM hipfire today cs go to quake champions and it feels me much more accurate but I dont know how I dont know what is the best for my muscle memory 360 or %0MM because %0MM gave me different inches different games mostly I'm trying to same my fov every game %0MM or 360 what is really best for muscle memory?

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30 minutes ago, Pyroxia said:

Hello I tried %0MM hipfire today cs go to quake champions and it feels me much more accurate but I dont know how I dont know what is the best for my muscle memory 360 or %0MM because %0MM gave me different inches different games mostly I'm trying to same my fov every game %0MM or 360 what is really best for muscle memory?

Try use a close FOV for each game if possible, but use 0% for everything, 360 is not good for aiming muscle memory

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3 minutes ago, Skidushe said:

Try use a close FOV for each game if possible, but use 0% for everything, 360 is not good for aiming muscle memory

Thanks.

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I have one more question I'm using USA with 133 coefficient in bf4 this means I cant use %0mm for my scope and ads. only monitor distance vertical %133 works correctly and I'm matching my bf4 sens for every game. I want to know this option is good or bad? 

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3 hours ago, Pyroxia said:

I have one more question I'm using USA with 133 coefficient in bf4 this means I cant use %0mm for my scope and ads. only monitor distance vertical %133 works correctly and I'm matching my bf4 sens for every game. I want to know this option is good or bad? 

I don't know if I'm misunderstanding you but I'll go with what I understand.

I don't know BF4 but I think USA coefficient is the same as vertical mm% for the scopes in game, so if you want 0% monitor match, use 0 coefficient and you'll have 0% monitor distance match on your scopes.

Then use hipfire to convert to the other games, I might've misunderstood but there you go

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On 9/15/2018 at 11:56 PM, Skidushe said:

mousedistance.thumb.png.7b86f2ad4c45560cc1d8ce1e69ff7ebc.png

I don't know if this is any use to people, but I wrote this out while I was trying to understand how the maths worked for monitor distance matching

Edited by Skidushe

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I've added in all the geogebra pages for each conversion type and also added in a section about changing the resolution to maintain focal length for different FOVs

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@Skidush

 

I read through your article again, and I just wanted to make sure that the settings I have set in the attached screenshot are going to yield the right values for 0% MD conversions. Also, is horizontal in your opinion as good as vertical fro doing these conversions?

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 4.33.15 PM.png

Edited by nielsenrc

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47 minutes ago, nielsenrc said:

@Skidush

 

I read through your article again, and I just wanted to make sure that the settings I have set in the attached screenshot are going to yield the right values for 0% MD conversions. Also, is horizontal in your opinion as good as vertical fro doing these conversions?

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 4.33.15 PM.png

Yes, they will obtain the right values, and for these calculations, monitor distance vertical 0% = monitor distance horizontal 0%

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Just now, nielsenrc said:

For example, here:

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 5.29.37 PM.png

Yes, your 360 distances will be different for games with different FOV, the more different the FOV, the more different the 360 distance. Try match them up if possible, but if not, it's still got all the benefits of 0% anyway

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Hello @Drimzi @DPI Wizard @Skidushe ,

I have an issue with my conversion. I read numerous time that 0%  vertical Monitor distance = horizontal  with the same aspect ratio,  but when I try to convert 1600 x 1080 streched to 1920 / 1080,  I have different results with Horizontal  and vertical, which is logical reading the the post. One issue however, is that you said this :

Citation

The image above shows the horizontal monitor distance match, going from the centre to the left and right edges of the monitor. Vertical monitor distance match is as if you rotated the scale 90° and fit it on the monitor, so instead of going to the centre to left and right edges it went from the centre to the top and bottom of the monitor.

There's both options as the vertical match is aspect ratio independent (doesn't matter how wide your monitor is compared to how high it is)

So I wanted to use vertical since I prefer having the "ruler" vertically since  the horizontal pixels are changing from game to game.

However when I try the vertical version the result varies when i change horizontal px and fixed when I change vertical px. Which is very counter intuitive if your explanation is true.

Btw, when I use horizontal it's the exact opposite.  The old calculator seems reacts the same way as the supposedly horizontal version.

So two options : - Your explanation is wrong 

                              - Monitor Distance - vertical is actually the horizontal version  and the labels in the calculator are reversed.

Please check out  the conversions that i talked about linked below.

Which one should I use in the end ? Is it still accurate with 16/10 streched ? Thanks

 

edit: sorry about the images taking all this space i thought it would be inside a little box as linked files

hor 800.JPG

hor 1600.JPG

hor 1920.JPG

old.JPG

vert 800.JPG

vert 1600.JPG

vert 1920.JPG

Edited by jz_31@hotmail.fr

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29 minutes ago, jz_31@hotmail.fr said:

Hello @Drimzi @DPI Wizard @Skidushe ,

I have an issue with my conversion. I read numerous time that 0%  vertical Monitor distance = horizontal  with the same aspect ratio,  but when I try to convert 1600 x 1080 streched to 1920 / 1080,  I have different results with Horizontal  and vertical, which is logical reading the the post. One issue however, is that you said this :

So I wanted to use vertical since I prefer having the "ruler" vertically since  the horizontal pixels are changing from game to game.

However when I try the vertical version the result varies when i change horizontal px and fixed when I change vertical px. Which is very counter intuitive if your explanation is true.

It's not really tied to horizontal or vertical pixels, but to the FOV. You need to check if the HFOV or VFOV changes when you change the resolution, and this depends on the game.

In Fortnite when you change from 1920x1080 to 1600x1080 the HFOV stays the same while VFOV changes, and if you change from 1920x1080 to 1920x800 VFOV stays the same and HFOV changes. Fortnite handles FOV weirdly so it's a really bad example to see how MDH and MDV works.

MDV and MDH is the same with 0% only if the AR is the same on both sides of the equation (so only from 1920x1080 to 1920x1080 etc).

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il y a 2 minutes, DPI Wizard a dit :

It's not really tied to horizontal or vertical pixels, but to the FOV. You need to check if the HFOV or VFOV changes when you change the resolution, and this depends on the game.

In Fortnite when you change from 1920x1080 to 1600x1080 the HFOV stays the same while VFOV changes, and if you change from 1920x1080 to 1920x800 VFOV stays the same and HFOV changes. Fortnite handles FOV weirdly so it's a really bad example to see how MDH and MDV works.

MDV and MDH is the same with 0% only if the AR is the same on both sides of the equation (so only from 1920x1080 to 1920x1080 etc).

Thank you, so in your opinion what should I use ? 5.67 (MDV 0% with 1920/1080 as the fortnite's res even tho I don't use it ) ?

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Man i'm still confused even after reading this guide, and trying to set it up correctly, I probably messed up somewhere. Wish someone would make an uptodate video guide with all the best settings and practices... What's up with this note uder pubg ?  The Sensitivity value is the value that is displayed in-game, and will be used to overwrite the LastConvertedSensitivity value if any settings are changed in-game. Use the In-game conversion to calculate this value as well, and combine them.

What ingame conversion, combine them how/where ?

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On 1/17/2019 at 10:58 PM, madDog said:

Man i'm still confused even after reading this guide, and trying to set it up correctly, I probably messed up somewhere. Wish someone would make an uptodate video guide with all the best settings and practices... What's up with this note uder pubg ?  The Sensitivity value is the value that is displayed in-game, and will be used to overwrite the LastConvertedSensitivity value if any settings are changed in-game. Use the In-game conversion to calculate this value as well, and combine them.

What ingame conversion, combine them how/where ?

This is just pubg being irritating to set up exact sensitivity values. There should be around that text a file url to the gameusersettings file which you can change your sensitivity to an exact value in. I don't have my pc rn because I'm waiting for a return on some RAM that broke but It should be in:

%LOCALAPPDATA%\TslGame\Saved\Config\WindowsNoEditor

which you can copy paste into the file explorer, then open

'GameUserSettings.ini'

in whatever editor you want. There's a really longggg line with the sensitivity values in. do Ctrl-f and seatch for 'LastConvertedSensitivity' and there should be them one after another as the calculator shows and you can put the two values in for what it shows in game or what it shows in the config file (The reason there's two is because the values they use for the game engine are small and wouldn't be easy for a person to understand in game so they set up a linear relationship between them)

BUT there is an easier way to do this. Convert using the 'in-game' method in the calculator, then go into game, type them into the box on the left next to the slide and DONT HIT ENTER and move onto the next  box until you've filled them all in remembering not to hit enter then hit apply. Your sensitivities will be set propperly for both the 'in-game' value and also the 'config file' value.

There is one caveat to this which is more pubg's problem. If you go and change any keybindings and hit apply after you've set these again it will round your sens values to the nearest whole number. as shown in the settings window. Your two options are either re type in the sens values if you need to change the key bindings, or edit the config file directly to update your keybindings.

Hope this helped..

-Tom

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The Sensitivity Rating (A comparator for perceived sensitivity)

The Sensitivity Rating is a best-effort value used for measuring and comparing the perceived sensitivity.

For 2D, the sensitivity rating is called 'Control-Display Gain' (CD Gain).

For 3D, the sensitivity rating doesn't really have a term. 'Curvature Focal Length Product' (CFLP) has been suggested to me.

 

The 360° distance (cm/360°, cm/rev) is not a measurement of sensitivity. It is just the distance to rotate one revolution. It can't be used for comparison reasons and you can't just preserve the 360° distance and expect the mouse to feel the same. An identical 360° distance at a low and high magnification will result in a higher sensitivity rating for the low magnification and a lower sensitivity rating for the high magnification. The 360° distance is only useful to imagine and preserve the general mousepad utilisation and mouse swipes used for navigation.

 

If you want to know what your sensitivity rating is, you can use this calculator. Ignore the whole graph thing. Just look to the results in the left column. Fill in the variables. Look for the CD Gain value for 2D and 3D. The default values have a 4.45 sensitivity rating.

 

 

Measuring 2D Sensitivity (Control-Display Gain)

2D sensitivity is measured as the ratio between mouse and cursor velocity (or displacement).

To calculate the 2D sensitivity, you need to know the following:

  • Mouse CPI (the number of counts reported by the mouse after an inch of displacement)
  • Windows Pointer Speed (the number of counts required to increment a pixel)
  • Monitor Size and Resolution (to find the distance of a pixel)

 

image.png.96fa2c556a064b54716dea46b42a6bed.png

 

Visualisation:

Mouse moves 1 unit, cursor moves 1 unit. There is a 1:1 ratio, or a 1 Sensitivity Rating.

Mouse moves 1 unit, cursor moves 3 units. There is a 1:3 ratio, or a 3 Sensitivity Rating.

2d_sens.png

 

 

Measuring 3D Sensitivity (Curvature Focal Length Product)

3D sensitivity is measured as the ratio between the virtual projection circumference and the physical sensitivity circumference (cm/360°).

To calculate the virtual projection circumference, you need to know the following:

  • Game field of view (to calculate the focal length in pixels, which is the radius for the virtual projection. 2pi * radius = circumference)
  • Monitor Size (to know the size of a pixel, and convert the focal length to a physical measurement)

To calculate the physical sensitivity circumference, you need to know the following:

  • Mouse CPI (the number of counts reported by the mouse after an inch of displacement)
  • Rotation Increment (the degrees rotated per count)

 

Visualisation:

Virtual projection circumference, focal length, and field of view.

unknown.png

 

Visualisation:

The ratio between the virtual projection and physical sensitivity in a spherical form, and how the ratio should be preserved when changing field of view (achieved with MDV 0%).

If the virtual projection and physical sensitivity have the same circumference (they are the same size sphere), then it will be a 1:1 ratio, or a 1 Sensitivity Rating.

If the virtual projection has a 3x larger circumference than the physical sensitivity, then it will be a 1:3 ratio, or a 3 Sensitivity Rating.

unknown.thumb.png.05e509176a172a0bd6a164c2b64cef73.png

 

 

Why MDV/MDH 0% is the correct conversion

0% preserves the sensitivity rating. It scales the physical sensitivity circumference by the change in the virtual projection circumference (2pi * focal length).

When you change the field of view, what happens is the game zooms in or out to fit the desired angle of view into the monitor space. It accomplishes this zoom by changing the radius (focal length).

When the field of view changes, there are many observable properties in the image that change:

  • Scale (the size of objects relative to the monitor)
  • Velocity (the speed that objects move relative to the monitor)
  • Curvature (the amount of virtual projection curvature relative to the monitor)

These properties don't scale by the change in field of view itself, but rather the change in focal length. It makes sense that the physical sensitivity will also change by the same factor.

The change in field of view itself has no impact on your perceived sensitivity. You can obstruct some of the field of view with black cardboard, cropping the visible field of view from a 16:9 aspect ratio to a 4:3 aspect ratio and the sensitivity will feel the same.

Sidenote: The term '0%' is only used in this post because that is the option in the mouse-sensitivity.com calculator that scales by the change in focal length. The idea of '0% Monitor Distance' is the completely wrong framework (2D). It results in the correct answer, but it implies that the sensitivity is only correct under the crosshair, and incorrect everywhere else. It also implies that scaling by the change in field of view itself results in the sensitivity being correct for different points on the screen. This is false. Distance is not sensitivity, 2D distance is meaningless, and 2D distance is only observable in the rarest most cherry picked case. Hopefully in the future, the method will be separated from the 2D framework.

 

 

Why 0% can still feel 'wrong' or uncomfortable

General navigation is the most obvious. Different games have different field of view restrictions. If you convert 0% for hipfire, you will end up with a different physical sensitivity circumference for each game. This results in different mousepad utilisation and mouse swipes for general navigation. Low field of view games can become a chore, with big swipes just to look around.

In this case, preserving the 360° distance instead can be more optimal for performance. It will be perceived sensitivity that will change with the focal length rather than the physical sensitivity.

 

For aiming however, the difference in feeling that you get is due to the image curvature rather than the sensitivity itself. The higher the field of view, the more curved the image will be, and vice versa. Here is an extremely low fov, where only a tiny portion of the virtual projection sphere being projected onto the screen, which results in a very flat image.

unknown.png

Even if you convert the sensitivity properly, you are aiming on a different curvature. Preserving the sensitivity is not enough to preserve aim performance, you still have to learn how to aim at different curvatures.

 

 

Why Monitor Distance Matching isn't helpful

  • Monitor Distance Match is matching a 2D screen space distance.
  • You don't perceive rotational distance as a 2D distance. You don't move the camera's position in 3D space, you rotate it.
  • It's only observable as a match in 2D screen-space distance if you do pure scripted vertical (pitch) movement. Pure scripted horizontal (yaw) movement can work too your pitch must be ~0. If you look up or down, yaw will follow follow an ellipse, making you spin like a ballerina. That horizontal point on the monitor that you were matched to is now impossible to reach.
  • The scaling curve has no correlation with how the sensitivity feels. Change the field of view and sensitivity in real-time and the sensitivity will feel like it is fluctuating.

 

 

Mouse-Sensitivity.com & Cross-Monitor Conversions

Just be aware that the mouse-sensitivity.com calculator doesn't support cross monitor conversions for perceived sensitivity. 0% will only scale the relative change in focal length, it doesn't scale by the focal length itself. You can't use mouse-sensitivity.com to convert other people's sensitivity if the monitor size is different.

 

Here is a picture of two different monitors (one is half the size of the other one) using the same field of view. The calculator doesn't know that these are different things. It just looks at the field of view number and thinks its the same. It will give you the wrong result. You will actually need two different cm/360° here, contrary to what the calculator says.

969333531_90overlayed.thumb.jpg.14239aa1cc7a4d70ab7c8a561fe425fd.jpg

 

Here, the small monitor has reduced the fov to match the focal length of the large monitor.

218532443_5390.thumb.jpg.39a01d705886e15d4c0a248498c681a0.jpg

Here, the large monitor has increased the fov to match the focal length of the small monitor.

1098856454_90127.thumb.jpg.6daba7019766b01064ce0eb35a8b613b.jpg

Edited by Drimzi

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39 minutes ago, Drimzi said:

Don't really want to start a new thread. I'll just add this here so I can link back to it whenever there are questions about 0%, focal length, etc.

 

 

The Sensitivity Rating (or Gain), referred to as 'Control-Display Gain' in academic papers and such, is the measurement of your sensitivity. When trying to compare, or copy sensitivity, you can't exactly take someones cm/360° at face value and expect it to give a representation of the person's sensitivity. The cm/360° can only be used to figure out their general mouse movement and mousepad utilisation for navigation, and 180 degree swipes. When it comes to how sensitive the mouse actually feels, and for aiming within their field of view, you have to know their 'sensitivity rating'. A measurement that tells you how sensitive their mouse is.

 

 

Measuring 2D Sensitivity

In 2D, sensitivity is measured as the ratio between mouse and cursor displacement.

To figure out the ratio of displacement, you need to know the following:

  • Mouse CPI (the number of counts reported by the mouse after an inch of displacement)
  • Windows Pointer Speed (the number of counts required to increment a pixel)
  • Monitor Size and Resolution (to find the distance of a pixel)

If the mouse displaces 1 cm (or any other distance unit), and the cursor also displaces 1 cm, then you have a 1:1 ratio, or in other terms, 1 sensitivity rating. If the mouse displaces 1 cm, and the cursor displaces 5 cm, then you have a 1:5 ratio, a 5 sensitivity rating.

If you have mouse acceleration, then you have a dynamic sensitivity gain.

 

Visualisation of 2D sensitivity.

2d_sens.png

 

 

Measuring 3D Sensitivity

In 3D, sensitivity is measured as the ratio between the spherical image (before being projected as a 2D image) and the mouse sphere (cm/360°). Don't try to measure anything in 2D, it is 3D after all.

To figure out the size of the image sphere, you need to know the following:

  • Game field of view (to find the focal length in pixels, which is the radius for the image. 2pi * radius = circumference)
  • Monitor Size (to know the size of a pixel)

To figure out the size of the mouse sphere, you need to know the following:

  • Angle increment, ultimately the distance to rotate 360 degrees

 

Visualisation of field of view, focal length, and the image sphere.

unknown.png

 

Visualisation of the change in image (blue sphere) when going from high fov to low fov, as well as the correct change in cm/360° (red), which is accomplished by doing a 0% conversion.

unknown.thumb.png.05e509176a172a0bd6a164c2b64cef73.png

 

If you pretend that both the red and blue are the exact same size, then this will be a 1:1 ratio, or 1 sensitivity rating. The cm/360° will be 2 pi * focal length. If the red sphere was one fifth the size of the blue sphere, then you will have a 1:5 ratio, or 5 sensitivity. Ultimately, the cm/360° depends on the image, which is dependent on the field of view and the size of your monitor.

 

 

Why 0% is the correct conversion

When you change the field of view, what happens is the game zooms in or out to fit the desired angle of view into the monitor space. The main thing that changes is the focal length/radius, which results in the field of view change, the scale change, the curvature change, etc. You simply scale the amount that you rotate by the change in focal length in order to preserve the sensitivity, which is what 0% does.

 

You don't perceive other nuances in the image, like the change in field of view. You will instead perceive the change in image, the scale change, the curvature change, the change in focal length, which can then carry over to you scaling the mousing behaviour by the exact same amount automatically. This is why 0% is the preferred method for hipfire -> ads/scopes. You press a button, you see the image scale by some random factor, like 2x (or any other magnification), and you scale your mouse input by 2x. The only issue is the change in mousepad utilisation, range of motion, etc can disrupt comfort. You just have to get use to the fact that you will have to scale your input, and can't just use the same tiny portion of the mousepad or the same little movement for everything.

 

Also don't think of 0% as only being accurate under the crosshair and being inaccurate elsewhere. It is only referred to as 0% due to how the calculator is set up, and that is just the wrong way of thinking. Trying to measure the 3D sensitivity using 2D measurements.

 

 

0% can still feel 'wrong' or uncomfortable

General navigation is the most obvious. If you convert 0% for hipfire, you will end up with different mousepad utilisation for general navigation in different games. Low fov games can become a chore, with big swipes just to look around.

For aiming, it is the image curvature that results in the off feeling. The higher the fov, the more curved the image will be, and vice versa. Here is an extremely low fov, where only a tiny portion of the sphere is visible on the screen, which results in a very flat image.

unknown.png

Even if you convert the sensitivity properly, you are still aiming on a different surface. This is why you end up with different trajectories and distances when aiming, even within the field of view. You will end up with greater distances and straighter trajectories at low fov, and shorter distances and curvier trajectories at high fov. This is just something that you have to get use to.

 

 

Why 'monitor distance match' isn't really helpful

Curvature and rotation is why trying to 'distance match' isn't helpful. For one, you don't perceive rotational distance as a 2D distance. You don't shift the camera's position in 3D space, you rotate it. Two, it's only observable as a 2D, screen-space distance match if you do pure vertical movement, or pure horizontal movement (latter requires a script and for you to be looking straight). As soon as you look up or down, you will just spin like a ballerina, and that distance matched flick will no longer work...which already required pure horizontal movement that no human could ever do, and for the enemy to be on a pure horizontal path from your crosshair. A certain monitor match % that feels good to you is purely coincidental. You would have arrived at that % based on the engagement distance that you tested it at, which resulted in a preferential balance between aiming speed and navigation without drastically changing your mousepad utilisation.

 

 

Conclusion

Convert everything with 0% and you will have a constant sensitivity. The ratios will remain constant no matter what fov you are playing at. Converting from Windows/Desktop with 0% will result in both 2D and 3D having the same sensitivity.

Any other conversion method is just generating a new sensitivity that preserves some desired characteristic, that is only observable in the most rarest cherry picked scenario.

Once you understand that cm/360° depends on the focal length, it becomes meaningless to share and copy cm/360° values. To get an idea of other people's sensitivity, you need to know their monitor size and field of view, in order to get their sensitivity rating.

If you want to know what your sensitivity rating is, you can use this calculator. Ignore the whole graph thing. Just look to the left column. Fill in the variables. Look for the CD Gain value for 2D and 3D. The default values have a 4.45 sensitivity rating.

 

 

 

 

Side-note

Just be aware that the mouse-sensitivity.com calculator doesn't support cross monitor conversions. 0% will only scale the relative change in focal length, it doesn't scale by the focal length itself.

 

Here is a picture of two different monitors (one is half the size of the other one) using the same field of view. The calculator doesn't know that these are different things. It just looks at the field of view number and thinks its the same. It will give you the wrong result. You will actually need two different cm/360° here, contrary to what the calculator says.

969333531_90overlayed.thumb.jpg.14239aa1cc7a4d70ab7c8a561fe425fd.jpg

 

Here, the small monitor has reduced the fov to match the focal length of the large monitor.

218532443_5390.thumb.jpg.39a01d705886e15d4c0a248498c681a0.jpg

Here, the large monitor has increased the fov to match the focal length of the small monitor.

1098856454_90127.thumb.jpg.6daba7019766b01064ce0eb35a8b613b.jpg

Thanks for the information drimzi. I have 24" monitor currently I'm using my bf4 sens to convert everygame with %0mm. My windows sens not same but close (wps 9/20) what do u prefer? am I need to convert my windows sens everygame for more precision? Sorry for bad english.

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On 2/1/2019 at 12:16 AM, Pyroxia said:

Thanks for the information drimzi. I have 24" monitor currently I'm using my bf4 sens to convert everygame with %0mm. My windows sens not same but close (wps 9/20) what do u prefer? am I need to convert my windows sens everygame for more precision? Sorry for bad english.

I just convert everything from Windows. It doesn't really matter though, it just makes it feel the same. It doesn't make you aim better or anything.

Also I would prefer if you didn't quote the whole entire post.

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I would like some 1 to confirm if i'm doing this correctly! I'm getting a different result on png 3 and 4 from png 1 & 2 which mean i don't this correctly. I want my battlefront 2 mouse sensitivity and my sniping (DLT) sensitivity to match Overwatch Sensitivity from png 1 which is 8 at 400 dpi. 

Any advice?

1.PNG

2.PNG

3.PNG

4.PNG

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my distance per 360 is 17.04 inches is that considered very slow as you mentioned that for very low sens players 0% -vertical isnt good. or what exactly a very low sens. and which method is good for my sensitivity. also if the fov is the same in both games is it ok to use distance per 360 converting

Edited by hussamada61

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10 minutes ago, hussamada61 said:

my distance per 360 is 17.04 inches is that considered very slow as you mentioned that for very low sens players 0% -vertical isnt good. or what exactly a very low sens. and which method is good for my sensitivity. also if the fov is the same in both games is it ok to use distance per 360 converting

It's what most would consider 'slow' but It's certainly playable. I played with a ever so slightly faster sens than that for about 2 years with 0% mm and I did fine. As long as you're fine with moving your whole arm and have a large mouse pad I'd stick with it if you're comfortable. I recently changed mouse and mouse pad and decided to change my sens to 35cm/360 ~103FOV which I thought was a happy mid ground for the cs/overwatch I play but I played on 40cm/360 before which Is really close to your 42 and played fine if not better until I adjust to my new setup with 0% MM

I'd consider a 'very low' sens > 50cm/360 probably

And yes, if FOV's are the same you can use 360 and you should get the exact same numbers (regardless of the conversion method)

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