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Hey, so is this whole post also saying that it's impossible to have a single, perfect formula? In that case, am I perfectly fine in just using the formula I have been using and not stress about it (as it and everything else will have benefits and drawbacks, but mine is the one I'm used too)? I think it's an older viewspeed formula from like a year ago that isn't the current one being used in the calculator.

I'm asking now because I changed my sensitivity a while ago because it was too fast for me but somehow I am unable to get used to it like I have done in the past. I just keep undershooting if I play 2d games, then it feels too fast in overwatch, and it's making me pull my hair out. Guess I'm probably just looking for something to blame, as I haven't really played much in a year.

Regardless, I would appreciate if I could get the formula for the current viewspeed vertical setting that's being used in the calculator.

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30 minutes ago, Kilroy said:

Hey, so is this whole post also saying that it's impossible to have a single, perfect formula?

No formula will preserve everything.

  • 0% will preserve the sensitivity.
  • 360° Distance will preserve rotation distance.

 

27 minutes ago, Kilroy said:

Regardless, I would appreciate if I could get the formula for the current viewspeed vertical setting that's being used in the calculator.

Viewspeed scales the circumference (cm/360°) using:

sin(hipFov * pi/360) / sin(zoomFov * pi/360)

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2 hours ago, Kilroy said:

Hold on... how do you convert from 3d to 2d and vice versa?

(360 * sin(fov * pi/360))/(pi * pixels) = degrees turned per count

360/(dpi * (360 * sin(fov * pi/360))/(pi * pixels)) = circumference

(360 * sin(fov * pi/360))/(pi * yaw * pixels) = sensitivity value

 

For 0% MDV, just replace sin with tan.

Edited by Drimzi

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I understand why 0mm is in theory the best way to convert sensitivities between different fov's. But i am just wondering at what level do people play that moved to 0mm play their games, casual/competitive/pro and did moving to 0mm really improve your game?

not so interesting long wall of text ;) :

the main issue i have with 0mm is that moving from a higher (hipfire) fov to a lower (scoped) fov in a game, has the most impact on how we aim. Even after long periods of trying (months). The reason is that i feel that with aiming there are 3 ways to aim: aiming with the fingers, aiming with the wrist and aiming done by the arm. 

These 3 ways of aiming are working together with the way we grip the mouse (fingertip,claw,palm,hybrids) and the preferred style of aiming the user has. People tend to favour a type of aiming, high sensitivites mostly skip large arm movements and low sensitivities of course do need that.

now with 0mm every fov change in a game (like going from 103fov hipfire to a 20fov scope) will impact the way we have to use the way of aiming. This results in maybe the perfect conversion of sensitivity between fov's, but i have to relearn for every fov a different way of aiming -> so i get the feeling that 0mm in the same game for scopes is maybe less usefull than using a mm % that preserves the way we aim the most or the way of aim we prefer.

Personally i would like to preserve the way i have to aim, keep the finger/wrist/arm movements as close as possible within 1 game. I think 100mm, 75mm, 56.25 and viewspeed do all a better job at that than 0mm. Question here, is there a best way to calculate this?

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1 hour ago, sammymanny said:

I understand why 0mm is in theory the best way to convert sensitivities between different fov's. But i am just wondering at what level do people play that moved to 0mm play their games, casual/competitive/pro and did moving to 0mm really improve your game?

not so interesting long wall of text ;) :

the main issue i have with 0mm is that moving from a higher (hipfire) fov to a lower (scoped) fov in a game, has the most impact on how we aim. Even after long periods of trying (months). The reason is that i feel that with aiming there are 3 ways to aim: aiming with the fingers, aiming with the wrist and aiming done by the arm. 

These 3 ways of aiming are working together with the way we grip the mouse (fingertip,claw,palm,hybrids) and the preferred style of aiming the user has. People tend to favour a type of aiming, high sensitivites mostly skip large arm movements and low sensitivities of course do need that.

now with 0mm every fov change in a game (like going from 103fov hipfire to a 20fov scope) will impact the way we have to use the way of aiming. This results in maybe the perfect conversion of sensitivity between fov's, but i have to relearn for every fov a different way of aiming -> so i get the feeling that 0mm in the same game for scopes is maybe less usefull than using a mm % that preserves the way we aim the most or the way of aim we prefer.

Personally i would like to preserve the way i have to aim, keep the finger/wrist/arm movements as close as possible within 1 game. I think 100mm, 75mm, 56.25 and viewspeed do all a better job at that than 0mm. Question here, is there a best way to calculate this?

The issue is you move to a state where you're choosing an arbitrary value for all your sensitivities. You're then learning muscle memory for aiming at the crosshair for every different FOV. Which if you can deal with that and would rather move your arm roughly the same amount each time, then I guess it's okay. 0%mm is keeping the same muscle memory across the FOVs at the crosshair. It makes sense that if you move further in, you're going to have to move your arm more but crucially, it's the same 'more' amount as it was before for the size of the target.

IMO, if your sensitivity isn't ridiculously high or low it's still the way to go. Playing a wide range of games with 0% mm across them all gets you to use the right part of the kinetic chain from your shoulder to your fingertips correctly. Small adjustment, fingertip. Large adjustment, shoulder. etc... Over time it just becomes one fluid motion, but it's not instant, it's something you need to adapt to. If you want to train this, I'd recommend getting really good at OSU! with a low sensitivity, it's basically a fast paced sniper training game for 0% mmers and involves both small movements and large and helps train you to use your entire arm, shoulder wrist and fingertips 

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