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Supraland

Acceleration is fixed and sensitivity numbers are added, so this game is in!
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Hitman 2

Pretty much the same as the previous Hitman, but here it is!
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Spellbreak

In-game and config file sensitivity added!
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jabbothehut

Using area of fov to convert sensitivities across zooms.

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So the idea here is say take rainbow six hipfire at 73.74 fov which has a horizontal fov of 106.26 and vertical fov of 73.74. Multiplied together you get 7835.6124.

When using the red dot your fov goes to 98.6 horizontal and 66.37 vertical. Multiplied together and you get 6544.082

When you divide hipfire area by red dot area you get 1.1973585294316299826316357282809.

The million dollar question is: Would multiplying your hipfire sens by this be a viable way of changing sens across zoom levels? You get a lower sens than if at 0%MM but it feels more controllable (Obviously because it is lower). What do you guys think? Is there any viability to this or is it pretty arbitrary? 

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It's arbitrary. The degrees don't matter, and with your method you will get different scaling depending on the shape of the monitor. With that logic, over hanging a cloth on either side of the monitor to reduce its width will require a new sensitivity.

 

Use this applet. Change the FOV to visually see the change in magnification. Pretend it's a 180 degree frame just moving forward/back to have the desired angle of view within the monitor, since the monitor doesn't grow or shrink to change the amount you can see. As the frame moves forward/back, everything will scale by the change in magnification. You simply undo that scaling on the sensitivity, which is what 0% MDV/MDH achieves. It will scale the sensitivity by the change in magnification.

 

0% scales only by the change, so it will only work when dealing within that monitor. If you wanted to translate that sensitivity to a different monitor, you would have to take the focal length into consideration. Two different sized monitors could have the same angle of view, but require different sensitivities, as the physical scale will differ. The quantity of degrees on screen hardly matters. You just use them to calculate the change in magnification relative to that monitor. If you are wondering, if two different sized monitors both have the same angle of view, then you just need to scale the sensitivity by the difference in monitor size.

 

The focal length is the radius for the image. 2pi * radius = circumference. Translating the sensitivity using 0% MDV/MDH will maintain the ratio between the image circumference and the sensitivity circumference. Any other method is just an arbitrary change in sensitivity.

Here is a visualisation:

unknown.thumb.png.05e509176a172a0bd6a164c2b64cef73.png

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5 hours ago, Drimzi said:

It's arbitrary. The degrees don't matter, and with your method you will get different scaling depending on the shape of the monitor. With that logic, over hanging a cloth on either side of the monitor to reduce its width will require a new sensitivity.

 

Use this applet. Change the FOV to visually see the change in magnification. Pretend it's a 180 degree frame just moving forward/back to have the desired angle of view within the monitor, since the monitor doesn't grow or shrink to change the amount you can see. As the frame moves forward/back, everything will scale by the change in magnification. You simply undo that scaling on the sensitivity, which is what 0% MDV/MDH achieves. It will scale the sensitivity by the change in magnification.

 

0% scales only by the change, so it will only work when dealing within that monitor. If you wanted to translate that sensitivity to a different monitor, you would have to take the focal length into consideration. Two different sized monitors could have the same angle of view, but require different sensitivities, as the physical scale will differ. The quantity of degrees on screen hardly matters. You just use them to calculate the change in magnification relative to that monitor. If you are wondering, if two different sized monitors both have the same angle of view, then you just need to scale the sensitivity by the difference in monitor size.

 

The focal length is the radius for the image. 2pi * radius = circumference. Translating the sensitivity using 0% MDV/MDH will maintain the ratio between the image circumference and the sensitivity circumference. Any other method is just an arbitrary change in sensitivity.

Here is a visualisation:

unknown.thumb.png.05e509176a172a0bd6a164c2b64cef73.png

Fantastic post! Thank you so much for your detailed answer! Top man!

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So to rewrite what you're doing:

1887412148_CodeCogsEqn(1).png.cb95deabbe005659f060da688a09bb14.png

Which is the same as

2095956301_CodeCogsEqn(2).png.01c975ce9136f4bb33f675978f75aa77.png

This is just 

(vertical match multiplier) * (horizontal match multiplier)

Honestly it feels like half of these threads are just throwing numbers at each other hoping something usable comes out of it. Viewspeed is the worst about this imo.

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8 minutes ago, Skwuruhl said:

So to rewrite what you're doing:

1887412148_CodeCogsEqn(1).png.cb95deabbe005659f060da688a09bb14.png

Which is the same as

2095956301_CodeCogsEqn(2).png.01c975ce9136f4bb33f675978f75aa77.png

This is just 


(vertical match multiplier) * (horizontal match multiplier)

Honestly it feels like half of these threads are just throwing numbers at each other hoping something usable comes out of it. Viewspeed is the worst about this imo.

Just throwing ideas out there man. If people can disprove them then that's all I need. You don't progress without trying to challenge a theory. As I said if someone proves me wrong and explains it logically and well then I'm happy.

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